Landscape Professionals

The following individuals market themselves as landscape professionals who work with California native plants.

We do not review their work or check credentials. Be sure to check contractor numbers, landscape credentials and references.


Arste, Willie—Landscape Professional, Sugarbush Landscape Care, (661) 294-3884 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Locations: Castaic

Asbell, Madena—Landscape Professional, Landscape Designer, LA Native Design, (323) 253-8706 www.lanativedesign.com, Location: Los Angeles

Baker, Tony—Landscape Professional, (310)377-2536, Locations: South coast

Balonic Ty—Landscape Professional, (818) 414-7096, Locations: La Crescenta, Los Angeles

Black, Orchid—Landscape Designer, Pitcher Sage Design, (626) 794-1275, Locations: Los Angeles

Buchanan, Dave—Landscape Contractor, Landscape Designer, Ocean Sage Landscaping (760) 942-9254, Locations: San Diego Co., North

Carcoso, Jerry—Landscape Professional, Mercado Landscape, (760) 949-3256, Locations: Inland, High Desert

Carscaden, Bill—Landscape Designer, Landscape Contractor, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Locations: Chino Hills

Clements Landscape and Pool Construction—Landscape Designer, Landscape Contractor, www.clementslandscape.com, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., (909) 481-3265, Locations: Inland, Los Angeles

Durant, Reggie—Landscape Professional, Back to Natives, (949) 285-0071, Locations: Orange County

Dykzeul, Ric—Landscape Professional, (310) 530-9102, Locations: South Coast

Frommer, Susan—Landscape Professional, (909) 461-9734 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Gimbel, Dustin—Landscape Designer, Dustin Gimbel Design, (818) 641-9375 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Hessing, Andreas—Landscape Contractor, Landscape Designer, (626) 296-0045

Jett, Suzanne—Landscape Professional, Jettscapes, (310) 392-4375, Locations: Santa Monica

Johnson, Courinne—Landscape Professional, (310) 644-0676 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Locations: South coast

Krusa, Lee—Landscape Designer, Claremont Environmental Design Group, (909) 625-3916, www.cedg-design.com, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Locations: Southern California

LeGrice, Yvonne—Landscape Professional, Landscape Architect, Native Design, (310) 403-6206 Locations: Los Angeles, N.E. LA

Perry, Alison—Landscape Architect, Perry Design, Inc., (714) 726-1192, Locations: Fullerton area (and north)

Pogue, Toni—Landscape Architect, Physis Design, (661) 513-8021, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Locations: Santa Clarita, San Fernando Valley and northern Los Angeles

Robinson, David—Landscape Architect, Claremont Environmental Design Group, Inc., (909) 625-3916, Locations: Claremont area

Smith, Alex—Landscape Architect, (323) 937-5478 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Locations: Southern Calfiornia

Swafford, Stephen—Landscape Architect, Indah Bulan, (323) 788-5163 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Locations: Southern California

Tessa, Nick—Landscape Professional, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Locations: Valley, Ventura

Summer Maintenance

These long, hot days of summer, focus on carefully watering and fertilizing your California native garden.

The best time to plant California native plants in the semi-arid or arid Mediterranean climate of interior landscapes of Southern California is during the cool, moist fall and winter months. The cooler soil temperature will help the root systems supply the needed water to the young or transpanted plant. Water is lost through evaporation when the ground is hot and if roots are damaged during installation hot, wet soil may promote root diseases.

Here are several maintenance tasks to help you keep your garden thriving throughout the summer.

Water

  • Cut back on water as heat turns on and plants slow down.
  • Water deeply and infrequently. Make sure water is going to the root area.
  • Continue watering riparian plants.
  • Water younger plants as needed (it takes about 2-3 years for a plant to establish, plant will be 2 – 3 times the size it was when planted).
  • Excessive summer water is one of the main causes of failure with California native plants. It encourages the spread of pathogens, and results in unsustainable growth. 

Pruning

  • Deadhead to keep summer bloomers flowering (seaside daisy, California aster)
  • Right after bloom period, deadhead Ceanothus and other spring bloomers to reduce occurrence of unsightly woody stems in next season.
  • Cut back salvias by about 1/3 – 1/2 after they bloom.
  • Selective pruning of evergreen oaks, mid July – early September to avoid powdery mildew on new growth.
  • Pinch new growth to encourage fuller, denser growth habit.

Pest Control

  • Hose leaf-sucking bugs off plants.
  • Introduce natural predators, such as lacewings and lady bugs. Be careful not to introduce non-native predators that may end up causing more trouble (such as giant preying mantis).
  • Irrigate properly to prevent stress. 

Mulch

  • Mulch up to 3-4” deep, keeping material away from stems.
  • Consider inorganic mulch (decomposed granite, pebbles, etc.) for scrub and desert gardens. 

Resist Planting

  • Although some have luck planting all year around, summer is the least desirable time to do this. In hot, dry areas, aim to plant trees and shrubs in mid-October through February and subshrubs, perennials and vines in mid-October through April. (planting information adapted from "Care and Maintenance of Southern California Native Plants Gardens," O'Brien, Landis, Mackey, 2006, p. 53)

Plan for Fall Planting Season

  • Save the date for the Fall Planting Festival at Grow Native Nursery Claremont, the first weekend in November.

Native Plants as Holiday Decor

Decorating with fresh greenery is one of the oldest winter holiday traditions.

Gathering Greenery

Please be responsible when gathering greenery. Make sure you are not trespassing on private property or violating state plant-protection laws.

With a little planning your own landscape can be a great place to look for holiday greenery. When gathering live greenery from your shrubs and trees, remember that you are actually pruning the plants. Consider carefully which branches to cut and which ones to leave. Distribute the cuts evenly around the plant in order to preserve its natural form.

Grow Native Nursery

Give the nursery staff a call for information about our current inventory of plants to add to your landscape.

Grow Native Nursery Claremont: (909) 625-8767 ext. 404
Grow Native Nursery in the Veterans Garden: (424) 234-0481

Pruning Guidance

Feel free to ask nursery staff about pruning guidelines. In general, do not prune off more than 25% of a tree's foliage within one year. 

Safety Considerations

Dried evergreens can become flammable when in contact with a heat source such as a candle flame. Keep fresh greenery away from all heat sources.

Make sure that any wreaths, roping and garlands that you bring indoors are as fresh as possible. Check needles by bending them. They should be flexible and not break. Avoid greenery that are shedding or that have brown, dry tips. Before bringing the greenery inside, soak them in water overnight to rehydrate them. You may also spritz your arrangements with water from a spray bottle, especially if the humidity is low inside your home.

Try to keep plants out of the reach of children and curious pets.

Below are some suggested varieties to use in holiday decorating.  

Trees  (* indicates species that may require supplemental irrigation)

Western Cypress (Cupressus arizonica, aka Hesperocyparis
Bigcone Douglas-Fir (Pseudotsuga macrocarpa)  
Bristlecone Fir (Abies bracteata)*
California Juniper (Juniperus californica)  
Coulter Pine (Pinus coulteri)
Grand Fir (Abies grandis)* 
Ghost Pine (Pinus sabiniana)
Incense Cedar (Calocedrus decurrens)*  
Knobcone Pine (Pinus attenuata)* 
Western Juniper (Juniperus occidentalis)
Parry Pinyon Pine (Pinus quadrifolia)
Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens)
Santa Cruz Cypress (Hesperocyparis abramsiana)
Sierra Juniper (Juniperus grandis)* 
Singleleaf Pinyon Pine (Pinus monophylla)
Torrey Pine (Pinus torreyana)
Utah Juniper (Juniperus osteosperma)
Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata)* 
White Fir (Abies concolor)* 

 

Decorative berries, foliage, floral displays

Berberis spp.
Lemonade Berry (Rhus integrifolia
Pacific Madrone (Arbutus menziesii)
Sugar Bush (Rhus ovata)
Toyon (Heteromeles arbutifolia)
 

Succulent wreaths

Dudleya ssp.
Stonecrop (Sedum ssp.)