Take-Out Menu

A portable kit is available to pick up and take to classrooms or scout meetings.

Native Partners: Indian Uses of Native Plants

Food, medicine, tools and fiber can all be derived from plant material. Many native California plants were, and still are, used by local Indians. Touchable props, boxed displays of plant material and an artifact identification game are included. Share the kit with as many students and classes or scouts as possible during the loan period. $40 for a two-week loan. Call 909-625-8767 x224 to reserve a kit and arrange a pick-up date.

Recommended for use if a class is registered for a two-hour Native Partners Program at the Garden.
Download Native Partners teacher information packet.

Science Content Standards

RSABG school tours and programs align with life science and history-social science content standards for California public schools and convey the importance of native plants, cultures of indigenous people and natural history of California.

Below are the content standards for each of our school tours and programs.

 

School Tours

A Sensational Walk: Science Content Standards for California

Kindergarten

Life Sciences

2a. Students know how to observe and describe similarities and differences in the appearance and behavior of plants and animals.
2b. Students know how to identify major structures of common plants and animals.

Earth Science

3a. Students know characteristics of mountains, rivers, oceans, valleys, deserts and local landforms.
3b. Students know changes in weather occur from day to day and across seasons, affecting Earth and its inhabitants.

Investigation and Experimentation

4a. Students observe common objects by using the five senses.
4b. Students describe the properties of common objects.
4d. Students compare and sort common objects by one physical attribute (e.g. color, shape, texture, size, weight)

First Grade

Life Sciences

2a. Students know different plants and animals inhabit different kinds of environments and have external features that help them thrive in different kinds of places.
2b. Students know both plants and animals need water, animals need food, and plants need light.
2c. Students know animals eat plants or other animals for food and may also use plants or even other animals for shelter and nesting.
2e. Students know roots are associated with the intake of water and soil nutrients and green leaves are associated with making food from sunlight.

Earth Science

3b. Students know that the weather changes from day to day but that trends in temperature or rain tend to be predictable during a season.
3c. Students know the sun warms the land, air and water.

Second Grade

Life Sciences

2a. Students know that organisms reproduce offspring of their won kind and that the offspring resemble their parents and one another.
2b. Students know the sequential stages of life cycles are different for different animals.
2f. Students know flowers and fruits are associated with reproduction in plants.

Earth Sciences

3c. Students know that soil is made partly from weathered rock and partly from organic materials and that soils differ in their color, texture, capacity to retain water and ability to support the growth of many kinds of plants.

Investigation and Experimentation

4a. Students make predictions based on observed patterns and not random guessing.

Third Grade

Life Sciences

3a. Students know plants and animals have structures that serve different functions in growth, survival and reproduction.
3b. Students know examples of diverse life forms in different environments.
3c. Students know living things cause changes in the environment in which they live. Some of these changes are detrimental to the organism or other organisms and some are beneficial.

Life Sciences

2a. Students know plants are the primary source of matter and energy entering most food chains.
2b. Students know producers and consumers are related in food chains and food webs and may compete with each other for resources in a ecosystem.
2c. Students know decomposers recycle matter from dead plants and animals.
3a Students know ecosystems can be characterized by their living and nonliving components.
3c. Students know many plants depend on animals for pollination and seed dispersal and animals on plants for food and shelter.

Fourth Grade

Earth Sciences

4a. Students know how to differentiate among igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks by referring to their properties and methods of formation.

 

A Sense of California: Science Content Standards for California

Kindergarten

* Students know how to observe and describe similarities and differences in the appearance and behavior of plants and animals.
* Students know how to identify major structures of common plants and animals.

First Grade

* Students know different plants and animals inhabit different kinds of environments and have external features that help them thrive in different kinds of places.
* Students know animals eat plants or other animals for food and may also use plants or even other animals for shelter and nesting.
* Students know how to infer what animals eat from the shape of their teeth.  Students know roots are associated with the intake of water and soil nutrients and green leaves are associated with making food from sunlight.

Second Grade

* Students know that organisms reproduce offspring of their own kind and that the offspring resemble their parents and one another.
* Students know the sequential stages of life cycles are different for different animals, such as butterflies, frogs and mice.
* Students know many characteristics of an organism are inherited from the parents. Some characteristics are caused or influenced by the environment.
* Students know there is variation among individuals of one kind within a population.
* Students know light, gravity, touch, or environmental stress can affect the germination, growth and development of plants.

Third Grade

* Students know plants and animals have structures that serve different functions in growth, survival and reproduction.
* Students know examples of diverse life forms in different environments such as oceans, deserts, tundra, forests, grasslands and wetlands.
* Students know living things cause changes in the environment in which they live: some of these changes are detrimental to the organism or other organisms and some are beneficial.
* Students know with the environment changes, some plants and animals survive and reproduce; others die or move to new locations.
* Students know that some kinds of organisms that once lived on the Earth have completely disappeared and that some of those resembled others that are alive today.
* Observe common objects using five senses.
* Describe properties of common objects.
* Describe the relative position of objects using one reference.
* Compare and sort common objects by one physical attribute.
* Communicate observations orally and through drawings.

* Draw pictures that portray some features of the thing being described.
* Record observations and data with pictures, numbers or written statements.
* Make new observations when discrepancies exist between two descriptions of the same object or phenomenon.
* Make predictions based on observed patterns and not random guessing.
* Compare and sort common objects according to two or more physical attributes
* Write or draw descriptions of a sequence of steps, events, and observations.
* Use magnifiers to observe and draw descriptions of small objects or small features or objects.
* Differentiate evidence from opinion and know that scientists do not rely on claims or conclusions unless they are backed by observations that can be confirmed.
 

Two-hour Garden programs

A Bird’s Life: Adaptation and Survival Strategies of Birds: Science Content Standards for California

Fourth Grade

Life Sciences

2.b.  Produces and consumers (herbivores, carnivores, omnivores and decomposers) are related in food chains and food webs and may compete with each other for resources in an ecosystem.
3. Living organisms depend on one another and on their environment for survival.
3.a. Ecosystems can be characterized by their living and nonliving components.
3.b. In any particular environment, some kinds of plants and animals survive well, some survive less well and some cannot survive at all.
3c. Students know many plants depend on animals for pollination and seed dispersal and animals on plants for food and shelter.

Fifth Grade

Life Sciences

2a. Students know many multicellular organisms have specialized structures to support the transport of materials.

Sixth Grade

Life Sciences

5.b. Matter is transferred over time from one organism to other in the food web and between organisms and the physical environment.
5c. Students know populations of organisms can be categorized by the functions they serve in an ecosystem.
5d. Students know different kinds of organisms may play similar ecological roles in similar biomes.
5e. Students know the number and type of organisms an ecosystem can support depends on the resources available and on abiotic factors, such a quantities of light and water,  range of temperatures and soil composition.

Native Partners: California Plants and California Indians: Science Content Standards for California

Third and Fourth Grades: This program augments social studies curriculum on California Indians for fourth grade.

Sixth Grade

6c. Students know the natural origin of the materials used to make common objects.

Native Partners: California Plants and California Indians: History-Social Science Content Standards

Third Grade

3.2 2.  "...how the local Indian nations adapted to their natural environment (e.g., how they obtained food, clothing, tools)."

Fourth Grade

4.2 1.  "...how they [the major nations of California Indians] depended on, adapted to and modified the physical environment by cultivation of land and use of sea resources."

Fifth Grade

5.1 Note: focus is on "the cliff dwellers and pueblo people of the desert Southwest, the American Indians of the pacific Northwest, the nomadic nations of the great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River."   -- not California nations.  

5.1  1. "Describe how geography and climate influenced...how they obtained food, clothing, tools and utensils."   

5.1  2.  "Describe their varied customs and folklore traditions."

Web of Life: The Study of Ecological Relationships and Diversity of Life: Science Content Standards for California

Fourth through sixth grades: This program focuses on food webs, energy flow and interdependence among living organisms.

Sixth Grade 4a. The source of energy for all living things on earth is the sun.         

Fourth Grade 2a., Sixth Grade 5a.: Plants convert the sun's energy into food energy for living things.     

Fourth Grade 2b. and c., Sixth Grade 5b.: Plants and animals interact to utilize this energy and transfer it to other living things.       

Sixth Grade 5b. and c.: The flow of energy is directional and available energy is finite.         

Fourth Grade 3a., Sixth Grade 5e.: Each ecosystem has essential non-living and living components which interact in various ways to achieve homeostasis (balance).      

Fourth Grade 3b., Sixth Grade 5e.: Different ecosystems are not separate, independent entities, but are connected in many ways.

Fifth Grade 6.a, Sixth Grade 5c. and d.: Organisms may be categorized by their functions and different kinds of organisms play similar roles in different biomes.     

Fourth Grade 5a., Sixth Grade 1d. and f.: Water for palm oasis comes from faults in the earth.       

Fifth Grade 2a.: (specialized structures) Examine palm boring beetle and carpenter bee.             

Fifth Grade 2c.: (digestion) Dissect owl pellet at oak. Fourth Grade 2c.: (decomposers) Oak fungi

Fifth Grade 3d. and e.: (water limited, origin of water for local communities) Fresh water at pond.

Fourth Grade 6a. and c., Fifth Grade 6e., Sixth Grade 7b.  Test pond water for organic or inorganic pollution.