Conservation

seminar series

Research

SEMINAR SERIES

The Research Department hosts a seminar series that feature speakers on a wide range of topics in evolutionary biology and ecology.

The Friday Seminar Series for spring 2019 is listed below. Seminars are open to all and held Fridays at 4 pm during the semester, unless otherwise noted. Please check in at the Kiosk and tell admissions staff that you are here for the seminar. You will be admitted at no charge. Out of respect for seminar speakers and to limit disruptions, guests of the Botany Seminar Series will not be admitted to the Garden after 4:10 pm. 

Jeffrey Karron, Ph.D.

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

https://uwm.edu/biology/research/ecology-evolution-and-behavior/

Friday

February

22

Research in the Karron Lab at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, focuses on evolutionary processes in flowering plant populations. How do plant mating systems evolve and how do patterns of pollinator visitation influence male and female reproductive success? Field experiments explore how ecological factors, such as the presence of co-flowering species, and heritable traits, such as floral morphology and floral display size, influence selfing rates and patterns of paternity in monkeyflower.

Seana K. Walsh

National Tropical Botanical Garden, Hawaii

https://ntbg.org/science/staff

Friday

March

01

As Conservation Biologist of the National Tropical Botanical Garden, Seana’s primary role is to lead in the development of the organization’s activities to implement the Hawaiʻi Strategy for Plant Conservation. She earned a Master’s degree in Botany from the University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa. Her applied research interests include plant breeding systems, pollination ecology, and population genetics.

Julie Kierstead-Nelson, Ph.D.

US Forest Service: Shasta-Trinity National Forest

Friday

March

08

Julie Kierstead – Nelson has spent her career promoting the discovery, enjoyment, and conservation of the flora of the western United States. Since 1989 she has been Forest Botanist for the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in far Northern California. Before that, she started the Berry Botanic Garden Seed Bank for Rare and Endangered Plants of the Pacific Northwest. Julie’s current focus is to encourage exploration and understanding of the Klamath Mountains flora. In recent years, she has collaborated on publishing several newly discovered plants of the Klamath Mountains, including Shasta huckleberry (Vaccinium shastense), Shasta maidenhair fern (Adiantum shastense), and Shasta fawn lily (Erythronium shastense). She instigated a taxonomic overhaul of the stonecrop Sedum section Gormania group, resulting so far in publication of Sedum citrinum and S. kiersteadiae; several other new taxa and a field guide to sedums and their relatives in California and Oregon will be published soon. Julie has contributed over 2,300 free use photos to CalPhotos, and many hundreds of voucher specimens from the Klamath and Cascade Ranges to California herbaria. has spent her career promoting the discovery, enjoyment, and conservation of the flora of the western United States. Since 1989, she has been Forest Botanist for the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in far Northern California. Before that, she started the Berry Botanic Garden Seed Bank for Rare and Endangered Plants of the Pacific Northwest. Julie’s current focus is to encourage exploration and understanding of the Klamath Mountains flora. In recent years, she has collaborated on publishing several newly discovered plants of the Klamath Mountains, including Shasta huckleberry (Vaccinium shastense), Shasta maidenhair fern (Adiantum shastense), and Shasta fawn lily (Erythronium shastense). She instigated a taxonomic overhaul of the stonecrop Sedumsection Gormania group, resulting so far in publication of Sedum citrinum and S. kiersteadiae; several other new taxa and a field guide to sedums and their relatives in California and Oregon will be published soon. Julie has contributed over 2,300 free use photos to CalPhotos, and many hundreds of voucher specimens from the Klamath and Cascade ranges to California herbaria.

Frank Ewers, Ph.D.

California Polytechnic State University, Pomona

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Frank_Ewers

Friday

March

29

The Ewers' lab research focuses on the structure, function and ecophysiology of plants. This includes the biology of chaparral shrubs of California, mangrove trees of Mexico, and temperate and tropical climbing plants.

Sarah Jacobs, Ph.D.

University of California, Los Angeles

http://zapatalab.org/pages/about.html

Friday

April

19

Sarah Jacobs works with a group of organismic biologists in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UCLA who are broadly interested in the evolution of biodiversity, in particular plant biodiversity.The lab focuses on evolutionary questions at shallow and deep time scales, with a special focus on the role of ecological factors in population variation, speciation, diversification, and the evolution of genomes and phenotypes. To address these topics, they integrate multiple types of data, tools, and approaches, including field observations, natural history, low and high throughput phenotyping, genomics, and computational biology. Most of the work is focused on flowering plants from south and central America and the California Floristic Province.

Kane Keller, Ph.D.

California State University, Bakersfield

http://kellerecology.com/

Friday

April

26

My research uses an integrative approach to explore how ecological and evolutionary processes influence population and community patterns. I am interested in the mechanisms by which positive species interactions and intraspecific variation in traits related to species interactions can impact population and community dynamics and co-evolutionary relationships. For my dissertation, I am studying how mutualisms and intraspecific genetic variation in both partners influence plant community diversity and composition. Specifically, I am currently exploring how the mutualism between the legume Chamaecrista fasciculata and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria influence the establishment of other species, and how intraspecific genetic variation within both mutualist partners influences species interactions and community dynamics.

Adam Schneider, Ph.D.

Hendrix College

https://www.hendrix.edu/biology/profile.aspx?id=86388

Friday

May

03

Adam Schneider completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto and is currently an Assistant Professor of Botany and the Herbarium Director at Hendrix College. He studies the ecology and evolution of parasitic plants. His dissertation was entitled "Evolutionary shifts associated with substrate endemism in the western American flora."

fran lehman

Botany Program Coordinator

(909) 625-8767, ext. 241
botany@cgu.edu